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Structured Products

58 white papers and resources

Below are a collection of structured products white papers which will show current thinking and modelling. Structured Products are designed to meet the financing requirements of companies beyond the remit of more conventional financial products. Generally offered by the large financial institutions, they are highly complex in nature and will be customised to meet specific risk-return objectives. Common structured products include collateralised bond obligations (CBOs), collateralised debt obligations (CDOs) and syndicated loans.

RBS launches ground-breaking ETF

The Royal Bank of Scotland has introduced the world’s first exchange-traded fund linked solely to commodity trading adviser (CTA) managers. It provides cost-efficient access to a diversified pool of CTA managers and investment styles.

Hybrids: Diversifying by unifying

Volatility is emerging as the norm for markets as analysts debate the interdependence of emerging markets and developed economies. Investors and risk managers who can gauge correlation between multiple asset classes correctly and unify them through hybrid products will find they are best prepared…

Solvency II – Capitalising on market distortions

European insurers – one of the largest groups of investors in the global financial markets – will operate under a single regulatory framework for the first time when Solvency II comes into force in 2013. This could trigger large re-allocations among their €7 trillion ($10 trillion) of assets, in…

Asian ETFs uncovered

The popularity of exchange-traded funds (ETFs) in Asia has grown rapidly since the end of the financial crisis, and providers are competing for their share in the market. Asia Risk has partnered with Deutsche Bank to produce the first survey on ETF trends in the region. The results reveal…

Back to basics

Investors familiar with equity markets often use turnover as an indicator of liquidity even when investing in exchange-traded funds (ETFs), but Keith Chan at HSBC explains why with ETFs this can be a common mistake to make.